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Book Review < Back

Dance Till Tomorrow vol. 1

Credits: Written and Illustrated by Naoki Yamamoto
Publisher: Viz

Commentary

DANCE TILL TOMORROW contains sex scenes. It contains nasty, graphic, globby, grunty sex scenes, replete with sweat stains and sound effects. Penises and vaginas and fluids often found on gym socks. Humping. Stirring the Soup. You follow me here? It's a naughty book.

Also, it's very sweet.

It's the story of a relatively unremarkable college student named Suekichi whose grandfather dies and leaves him a stamp collection worth 4.5 million dollars. As windfalls so often do, this one comes with a catch: in order to collect his inheritance, Suekichi must graduate from college, marry and start a career. Which is a bit of a problem since Suekichi isn't much of a student. Nor is he the ambitious type. In fact, he'd probably just blow off the inheritance altogether except that he's got a humdinger of a crush on Ms. Shimomura, the director of his avant-garde theatre troupe (which is called  wait for it  BONDAGE HORSE). Ms. Shimomura could use some money and boy would Suekichi like to give it to her. The money, I mean. But that, too.

Enter, Aya. (Boy, does he! ... Sorry.) She's beautiful, mysterious and in possession of soup that seemingly needs to be stirred -- vigorously and often. She's probably after Suekichi's inheritance, but she has a weird way of showing it. She's not helping him focus on his studies, that's for sure. Poor boy doesn't know if he's coming or going.

Add to the cast a lawyer, Suekichi's grandfather's ghost, a theatre-loving yakuza boss, two hilariously rendered modernist actors and a guy in a frog mask and you've got something that could be a screwball comedy from the 1930's if screwball comedies from the 1930's also included graphic scenes of soup-stirring. Which they didn't. But DANCE TILL TOMORROW does.

It's sweet, I tell ya.

-- Kelly Sue DeConnick

 
Kelly Sue DeConnick relocated from Brooklyn, New York to Kansas City, MO, where she lives with her husband and artbomb.net colleague, Matt Fraction. Kelly Sue writes the English adaptations of several manga titles published by Tokyopop and Viz. She can be found on the web at kellysue.com.

 


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